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Why I Won’t Donate to the Susan G. Komen Foundation

It’s breast cancer awareness month again, and pink ribbons are everywhere. My Krispy Kreme donuts were pink. The rodeo has 'Tough Enough to Wear Pink' night. Car bumpers have 'Save the Ta-Tas' stickers. A crass attempt at breast-cancer awareness has been circulating around Facebook. Prepubescent males have been sighted wearing pink arm bands with 'I Love Boobies' written on them. Even the NFL has hopped on the bandwagon with pink uniforms, gloves, shoes, etc.

I’m not even close to being a prude, but do we have to use ‘Boobie’ and ‘Ta-Ta’? I don’t consider those particular slang terms to be dignified or respectful. The Komen Campaign seems to be giving the less mature members of our society an excuse to be flippant and crude.

But none of those things are the reason that I won’t donate to Susan G. Komen.

A team of women from my workplace have been fundraising for three years for the Breast Cancer Three Day Walk. They sell baked goods and coffee to raise funds. I asked my coworker if it were possible to direct my funds toward researching the cause of the breast cancer boom. I asked if there was any way that I could ensure that my donation would not go to Planned Parenthood or any other abortion provider.

The answer came back that there was no way to guarantee that monies would go toward research and not toward Planned Parenthood and abortion. I declined monetary support of their efforts, and it was disappointing to have to do so.

Finding a cure for the 211,000 women per year who come down with breast cancer is of great importance. Of greater importance, it seems to me, would be finding the causes and preventing as many cases as possible. One cause has already been discovered. Look here for the meta-analysis of the research published in Mayo Clinic Proceedings. Here are a few tidbits I extracted from the research article:

Oral contraceptive (OC) use early in life is associated with more aggressive [breast cancer] disease.

OCs can be carcinogenic, especially when used before first full term pregnancy. The nulliparous breast is composed of undifferentiated structures, and it is only during a full-term pregnancy that the breast attains its maximum development. This development occurs in 2 distinct phases, an early growth phase and a late phase of lobular differentiation.  The undifferentiated breast structures found in the nulliparous breast may be more susceptible to carcinogens than the more differentiated structures found in the fully developed breast.

The results of this meta-analysis suggest that use of OCs is associated with an increase in breast cancer risk among premenopausal women or women younger than 50 years. The greatest risk appears to be for parous women who use OCs before first full term pregnancy.

Essentially, the younger a woman is when she starts taking oral contraceptives, the greater her risk. Her risk increases again even more once she becomes pregnant and carries the child to term. This is shocking news! How many women in the US fit this description? How does taking the pill ever win in a cost benefit analysis? Is being sexually available 24/7 more important than being around to watch your own children grow up? And why are the men involved here allowing this slow poisoning of their loved ones?

This article and others like it should be getting a lot of media coverage. They are not. This is a scandal of massive magnitude. This article should have been front-page news starting the day it was published, and if the Susan G. Komen Foundation really cared about women they would become instrumental in spreading the word of this risk.

Until they take a stand for women by financing more research into the CAUSE of the breast cancer epidemic and disassociate themselves from Planned Parenthood and any other anti-woman association, they will get none of my money.

55 comments | Add one of your own.

  1. Denys

    A welcome declaration, and a great post.

    The SGK movement is a frightening exercise in mass sentimentalist ideology. I am particularly aghast at the way major retailers for upper-middle class women get on board; I once refused to buy oatmeal at Safeway because all the packages were pink.

    Two Sundays ago was the “Race for the Cure” downtown, which meant that our tiny parish church and its little parking lot just one block north of the start-finish line (it’s a “non-competitive race,” by the way, so everyone can win) were overwhelmed with non-competitive racers and their supporters.

    The Gospel that morning was John 4:46-53, the healing of the magistrate’s son; the priest preached a homily in part about the Sacrament of the Sick.

    The real “cure”: Confession followed by Mass and Communion.

    Reply

  2. Alishia Hanson

    Imagine if you tried not to purchase ANY items that eventually gave to SGK. It would force you to buy local and be a slow food practitioner. EVERYBODY donates to SGK. I used to find this particularly obnoxious since I had ovarian cancer (whose month of recognition was last month…do you know their color…anybody? (crickets)…teal). Now there’s an entirely new aspect to my distaste for their profit-mongering. A friend who had a terminal illness and survived–thanks be to God–never gave money to the foundation that was constantly searching for a cure to his malady. His reason? “We’re all terminal. Who’s going to tell them about Jesus?” I liked that.

    Reply

  3. Dutchie Sinclair

    Honest question: how has PP wormed their way into EVERYTHING? Teachers unions, Amnesty International, Komen, etc.? It shuts out many compassionate people, or worse it places the blood of the unborn on the hands of those who go along with these causes anyway.
    And like so many other issues, saying no to Komen(and yes to life!) apparently is taken as being FOR cancer.
    I too HATE the tata’s thing. Hate it with breast feeding campaigns as well(“Whip ‘em out!”, baby onesies that proclaim”I’m a breast man”,etc.). Pornification of the culture.

    Reply

  4. FestivAle

    I would like to go into the nature of cure. Based both on my researched knowledge of cancer and treating numerous patients with cancer, there is no cure, if by cure you mean a protocol you can undergo once and have the underlying causes of cancer disappear. The pink people really just want their birth control without the side effects. If anyone really wants to avoid chronic disease, one needs to live healthily chronically. Health is a habit, just like any other virtue.

    At our clinic, when we treat a patient with cancer, the long-lasting results of remission are based on continuously healthy living, day in and day out. The cure is a habit, not just a point in time where enlightenment happens. Good health of body and soul are intertwined, or at least intimately and analogously parallel.

    This also brings me to the point of “organic” living. Since self-serving liberal causes such as SGK attract self-serving individuals, health is seen as a personal right, instead of a common good. I have my rights to Whole Foods, but at the same time, I have my reproduction rights. I see this contradiction all the time in my profession. For the well-being of a society, truly holistic living involves the well-being of the unit of society, which is the family, not the individual. If you want to avoid breast cancer as a society, or chronic disease in general, promote real organic living: a mother and father having a large family; having meals cooked at home and shared together as a family; living together at home with an understanding of where food comes from (a garden, living animals); namely, promote Catholic family life.

    I know I left out a number of middle steps, but this is a comment on a blogpost.

    Reply

    1. Dutchie Sinclair

      Nicely done! I am a little taken aback at the folks who scorn my Duncan Hines Cale mix, yet they are on OC and advocate marijuana. I posted an article elsewhere recently about new research showing that the pill may actually permanently alter the brain! Funny I bet we’ll never see a “Food Inc.” style film about Big Birth Control.

      Reply

    2. RecoveringCatholic

      I come from a very different perspective but still recognize all the good sense you have included in this post. Just one thing troubled me in your description of “organic living” — why specify a “large family”? Aside from your disparaging use of the word “liberal”, the rest of your post is wise enough to transcend dogma and apply to all people. Are you suggesting that families that are unable to have multiple children can not achieve a healthy, organic life?

      Still, my hat is off to you for your thoughtful post.

      Reply

  5. Kathleen

    Just an interesting side note, regarding the ubiquity of SGK – because this post is about breast cancer, I guess, GoogleAds thought it would be a good idea to put a huge Susan G Komen ad banner alongside your article…

    Reply

    1. Cindy Leonard

      Another alternative organization is Breast Cancer Prevention Institute, visit at: http://www.bcpinstitute.org/resources.htm
      Run by Dr. Angela Lanfranchi, it reveals the truth about the links between both oral contraceptives and breast cancer and abortion and breast cancer.
      We need to organize an alternate “Run for True Prevention” and use it to donate to these organizations. Every October it is painful to see the pink and know the extent of the deception. Thanks for exposing, Bette!

      Reply

  6. Danica

    Hi Everyone,
    Great post! My place of work partakes in nearly all the “pink” walks throughout the year, and it is frustrating to find how many charitable organizations contribute resources to PP.

    Another web site discussing the abortion-breast cancer link:
    http://stopabortionbreastcancer.org/fyi.htm

    This site will provide you with a list (for a donation) of all the organizations that are in any way connected to PP.
    http://www.fightpp.org/

    God Bless!

    Reply

  7. Pingback: More on SGK | Catholic Exchange

  8. Gina

    Thanks so much for this article! To begin with, there are just so much pinkness in all these that everything sounds just so frivolous, and those gaga-eyed ladies are already looking too superficial. Please do not think that I do not empathize with those who are victims of cancer for I am one of them; but the hoopla in its pinkness has already become sickening. Thank you for enlightening me that it is not just about cancer then, but also about Planned Parenthood. I did not know that. Those are two different things, and there seems to be a certain amount of deception involved. I will support research for cancer and no other. Thanks!

    Reply

  9. renee

    I take issue with Susan G Komen for a number of issues but I do know of one foundation, started by a friend of mine, that is raising money to help women get the tests they need but can’t afford and that otherwise are eligible for help through other organizaitons (such as SGK). She is very open and honest about her experience because she though other women would appreciate the frankness of it if they were facing the same situation. It may be too graphic for you, but the cause is a good one. http://www.courageismystrength.com She works with various clinics to help pay for mammograms. And 75 or 80% of the money raised will remain in the community that raised the funds.

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  10. New Breast Cancer Patient

    I am really diappointed to hear this shocking news about Komen being connected to PP. I was diagnosed with Breast Cancer Sept.9th of this year. Seeing Pink everywhere encourages me, that I am not fighting this fight alone. Seeing Pink reminds me that this is an illness, not a death sentance. Seeing Pink gives me comfort that research is being done so that my daughters don’t get this disease.
    Some of the “advertizing”: “save the ta tas, I love boobies” etc. are not directly linked to Komen, but are knock offs, targeted to the younger sector( this isn’t all bad, it is the teenagers’ mothers who need the reminder to keep up with anual screenings). If you recall in the 70′s the popular sandal called “Tiddies” had no link to Breast cancer awareness at all.
    It is a shame that good causes get linked with bad causes, and probably all for the sake of the mighty dollar. Unfortunately, it is a disease our whole country is infected with. Lack of morals, no respect for Godly values, and the breakdown of the family unit. Though I am not a Catholic, I am a conservative Christian and encourage all of us, Catholic and Prodestant to Pray for our country.

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  11. Lisa

    Hurray! Someone is speaking out against the SGK foundation! Like thousands of others, I have terminal cancer – not breast cancer. I too am sick to death of Pink this and Pink that t0 support breast cancer awareness. Breast cancer has merely become just another marketing gimmick, sad to say. When 89% of women diagnosed with breast cancer survive, I would say that it is as close to cured as possible. So why the continued fuss about awareness and reasearch? $$$$$$$.

    For those of us with rare cancers, every October is a slap in the face. We get no support from SGK. I’ve asked.

    Thank you also for pointing out the link between oral contraceptives and breast cancer. I believe there is also a link between abortion and breast cancer. Do we ever hear about these links? No, because they don’t fit the agenda. So sad. How many women will get breast cancer who might have changed their behavior or lifestyle to eliminate these known risk factors?

    Reply

  12. Aryn

    Did you know there is a none SGK organization that is looking for a cure to breast cancer and it is called the City of Hope and they are local. They have a walk that SRP supports and Bashas sells water to support their organization.

    Support City of Hope!

    Reply

  13. Joe

    By the way, The Girl Scouts also donate a large packet to the Planned Parenthood baby-killing, soul-killing, breast cancer-causing, mental-illness causing, drug/alcoholism causing (in post-abortive women), and sexual sin promoting machine.

    I used to love their cookies, but it is a sin to buy them now, knowing that they indoctrinate the young girls selling them AND ensure that the places they will refer them to for their future abortions (hopefully not) and cancer-causing contraceptives stay in business.

    As for the “where are the men” question. It’s quite personal, but when my wife and I were living in sin before marriage (long before I became a Catholic), I never pressured her to take the pill. In fact, I advised against it (she never took the pill, BTW). I was worried about the side effects before they were even well known or thoroughly documented. Thank God I had a little bit of sense.

    Reply

  14. Mike Cusack

    Our school bagpipe band used to play at the start of the race in Houston. I thought this was such a great event, until I heard that money went to Planned Parenthood. What a shame!

    Reply

  15. TOM bLAKLEY

    ” What we found is that a vitamin D supplement decreased the cancer incidence in postmenopausal women by about 60 per cent,” lead investigator Joan Lappe, an associate professor of both medicine and nursing at Creighton University, told CTV News.

    Reply

  16. Lil

    Excellent article. Please also add mammograms to the list of things causing breast cancer. Those x-rays are themselves carcinogenic, especially when done once a year as recommended. And no, unfortunately, the benefits do not outweigh the risks. A much better option is a thermogram. Most insurance will not cover the procedure, but for someone with high risk factors, the personal expense would be well worth it.

    Bright blessings to all facing the challenge cancer imposes. I lost my brother to cancer. I pray for us all.

    Reply

  17. Dan Lord

    Thank you for this outstanding article–this subject doesn’t get talked about enough in the public forum, and you’ve really nailed all the important aspects of the issue. God bless!

    Reply

  18. Juanita

    Thank you for alerting us to this article. I had heard ‘rumors’ of this connection but now have downloaded a copy of this research reported by a very reliable source (Mayo) – It is good to be able to quote FACTS

    Reply

  19. KarenDenver

    Thanks for the great post. I also have too many misgivings about Komen to give monetary support. By far, my biggest concern is the foundation’s wholesale support of Planned Parenthood.
    But I’d like to point out, for those interested, that the NFL’s efforts with its pink-themed merchandise is benefiting the American Cancer Society, not Komen.

    Reply

  20. Mack

    Oh, Dutchie, read the article and focus. Don’t drag in teachers’ unions; you may have them in Arizona, but only fifteen states do, and definitely not Texas. There are so many other good and useful and FOCUSED comments here, not the same-old, same-oldm copy-and-paste, closed loop of ‘net misinformation you’re recycling. Think for yourself.

    Reply

  21. JP

    I would like to shame you ladies for acting like high school girls. The bigger issue here is that THOUSANDS of women are dying every year from breast cancer that we do not have cure for. Women like MY MOTHER are diagnosed every year with breast cancer….women like my mother who NEVER took birth control and are devout Catholics who go to Church and confession on a regular basis. It is sad that you have so little to do in your lives that you have to scorn a group that is trying to do something positive. Wake up and face the reality – even most Catholic Diocese have abortion covered in their medical insurance. STOP using abortion as the ONLY issue on which to justify your actions. Shame on all of you for not being more Catholic and supporting people who need our help – whether they be men, women, and children impacted by breast cancer or mothers who cannot afford to keep their children.

    On a side note, here’s a thought – if we offered better social services and free public health care, maybe mothers wouldn’t feel like they need to abort their babies.

    Reply

    1. Dmitry Kafeaza

      This rickety and dilapidated polemic you’ve slapped together is about to get a stress test, courtesy of the local “high school girls” you’re attempting to shame.

      They’ll be along shortly.

      Reply

    2. Denys

      Here are some other thoughts:

      If we provided free education to everyone, maybe all young people would want to learn and make something of themselves.

      If Christ offered free grace to everyone, maybe everyone would want to accept it and repent of their sins.

      Reply

    3. Marie

      Jp. I am sorry for your mother.

      this is a catholic web site. the catholic church does not consider abortion to be a small thing. When a group takes money given in good faith to support helping sufferers of breast cancer like your mother, and then instead gives it to an organization that is spreading the CAUSE of that cancer.. it is worthy of bringing out into the open.

      No matter what the Church does, there will always be abortion, because there will always be people, women and men who put themselves ahead of the life of a child. Women will chose abortion and contraception, and they will be forced into it.

      NO ONE is suggesting that only women who abort or use birth control get cancer, but aborting and using birth control CAN contribute to causing cancer! It is not the womens fault they get the cancer, NO ONE is saying that, what we are saying is that giving money to an organization that supports an industry that contributes to the cause of the cancer in many women is like giving money to the tobacco industry under the guise of supporting a cure to lung cancer! It makes NO SENSE!! It isnt victim blaming, its cause blaming! and frankly, if less money was spent making everything pink for a cancer that we are already very much aware of, maybe more money could be spent on, oh, i dont know… FINDING A CURE! i will continue to pray for people affected by cancer, i will continue to support true charities who help those people.. but i will not give one red cent to people who will give MY hard earned money to the very people who are contributing to the CAUSE of this cancer! Not one, not for nobody, not even you. My prayers are with your mother, and with you. good day.

      You want us to be more CATHOLIC by SUPPORTING WOMEN WHO ABORT THEIR CHILDREN? that makes no sense what so ever. Love the sinner, hate the sin, not look the other way at both.

      Reply

  22. C. Christian

    I didn’t find out that SGK donated to Planned Parenthood until after I had given a donation at work. It made me sick. It also made me do a little research into who else supports Planned Parenthood. The results made me even sicker. It’s hard to live life as an American consumer without purchasing an item from a corporation that has donated to Planned Parenthood or has supported them in some way.

    Reply

  23. Dutchie Sinclair

    How are we acting like high school girls? Are they known to take strong stands on SGK? The bigger “bigger” issue is that PP aborts 300,000 babies per year, half of them presumably female. And 150,000 girls being killed in their mothers womb has NOTHING to do with breast cancer research or finding cures. So I just say, SGK-stay out of PP.
    Cancer is ruthless and doesn’t discriminate. Let’s put every penny toward fighting the disease, and stop sharing $$$ with PP.

    Reply

  24. Tim H

    @JP – it is never permissible to knowingly commit an evil act to prevent another evil act. That, my dear friend in Christ, it the teaching of the Catholic Church.
    ===
    I wasn’t aware that SGK supports Planned Parenthood. Good to know and the bottom line is that SGK supports an organization which contributes to that which they are fighting against.

    Talk about shooting yourself in the foot!

    It’s not really surprising. Contraception has caused sex to become a recreational activity and the natural result of the culture of rampant sexual promiscuity is teen pregnancy, homosexuality and abortion.

    Now we can add breast cancer to the list.

    -Tim-

    Reply

    1. Denys

      What’s your point?

      That’s what I thought.

      (Sensible discussion of ideas is so EASY when others don’t actually have to answer our questions, isn’t it? Don’t answer that, by the way. It would spoil the delicious imaginary conversation in my head in which I am smarter and wittier than everyone else.)

      Reply

  25. Kelly

    I feel you characterize birth control bills incorrectly. They are not used simply to “be sexually available 24/7.” While some young, pre-married women do use them, lots of married women use them to prevent pregnancy. Many women who have already had their first baby use pills until they are ready for a second baby etc.

    I also understand why people might use birth control even despite side effects. Sometimes the side effect of having a baby inside your uterus or life when you don’t want it there seems a little more pressing than a small risk of maybe getting breast cancer later on (when there are so many factors that affect this and decrease the risk). The solution to this is not abstinence. Women need choices, and sometimes birth control pills are simply the best choice.

    Reply

    1. Denys

      Kelly–

      Were you aware that this is a CATHOLIC blog? Perhaps you were misdirected. If you’d like to be convinced why artificial contraception is ipso facto an evil, stick around. If not, then you’ve come to the wrong place.

      (By the way: I, too understand why some people think IVF is a good thing, why gays should be able to marry people of the same sex, why women should be Catholic priests, why the Catholic Church should abandon the outdated pretense that it is the one true Church, why teenagers should be given condoms by their parents, why stem cells should be harvested from unwanted human embryos, why religious discourse should be banned from all public activity, why Christian physicians should either be forced to commit acts against their conscience or banned from practicing medicine entirely, and, yes, why modern women should have the freedom to use any and all technical/chemical/mechanical means to block their fertility as they see fit. I understand why people think these things, and thanks be to God I also understand why these positions are wrong.)

      Reply

    2. Captoe

      @Kelly,
      I think if birth control pills had been characterized as to “be sexually available 24/7″ you could safely dismiss that as hyperbole, as none of us thinks contraception gets you anywhere near that much attention. However, if you would kindly review the sentence that contains the phrase which troubles you, you would see that it ends in a question mark, indicating a question, one which you are free to answer as you will. What’s important to you; availability for sex or avoidance of an increased risk of cancer?
      (I’m going to assume for a moment that you are female.)
      If you would answer that ‘availability’ is your priority, that’s fine with me, but what of your male partner? Does your male partner also think that your life is to be risked over his own unwillingness to manage himself? I’m terribly sorry if that might be the case.

      Reply

    3. Bette

      Kelly,
      OC has allowed women to be sexually available 24/7 without the so-called “risk” of pregnancy. I have characterized it as it is.
      I do not make distinctions between married and unmarried users of oral contraception because the risk is the same for both, if not greater for those carrying a baby to term after using OC.
      Taking a known carcinogen should not be characterized as a “small” risk. At one time, smoking cigarettes was considered by many to be a “small” risk for lung cancer.
      My prayers are with you in the difficulties of life.

      Reply

    4. Marge Carol

      “women use them to prevent pregnancy” — The oral contraceptives do not prevent a pregnancy, they abort the fertilized egg which is a human being. This is one of the big lies — say it often enough and people believe it. Pregnancy is NOT prevented — just terminated.

      Reply

  26. Devout Christian and Catholic

    I find your tone in the sentence below degrading and demoralizing towards the women that are afflicted with breast cancer every year. “Finding a cure for the 211,000 women per year who come down with breast cancer is of great importance.”

    - Women do not have a choice as to whether they develop breast cancer, and in fact you have NO right to address women as you did in the above sentence of the response to Kelly above. A woman’s choices are exactly that HER choices. She made them and has to live with the consequences. It is pathetic for you to sit back with 20/20 hindsight and and berate her for making that choice, but you did not and will not live her life. In the future, I ask that you more carefully chose the words you use to describe this disease and your blind attacks on other who do not follow the direction and stance of a church that seems to be more interested in reverting to a PRE Vatican-II state than moving in the positive forward direction taken by Pope John Paul II.

    Reply

  27. Al

    I’ve read this article a couple of times to make sure I wasn’t missing something. I can understand and accept being frustrated by the SGK foundation. But nowhere in this article do you offer an alternative.

    Obviously a lot of people are concerned about breast cancer, and are willing to give money/time/energy to finding ways to combat it. It’s easy enough to condemn an organization, but if you’re going to do so please endorse one that meets your criteria. I am certain that somewhere out there is a charity that could use the publicity, and which is also trying to meet your standards. It seems lazy to me that you didn’t bother seeking one out.

    I’m tired of this idea that it’s enough to attack the problems without offering any solutions. If the people on this forum were serious about stopping abortion, there would be Catholic crisis pregnancy centers open across the street from every Planned Parenthood, the way Walgreens pops up next to every new CVS. If a pair of drugstores can do it, surely the Catholic church can.

    Reply

    1. JoAnna

      The National Breast Cancer Foundation (www.nbcf.org) is a good alternative. I e-mailed them to ask if they support Planned Parenthood, and they responded that they do not.

      That being said, I don’t know what their stance is on ESCR, but Google yields no evidence that they support it.

      Reply

    2. Aryn

      Al,

      Cindy in the above comments also offered:
      “Another alternative organization is Breast Cancer Prevention Institute, visit at: http://www.bcpinstitute.org/resources.htm
      Run by Dr. Angela Lanfranchi, it reveals the truth about the links between both oral contraceptives and breast cancer and abortion and breast cancer.”

      Reply

  28. Jillian

    I am curious, if you did not give funds to the women raising money for the 3-day Susan G Komen walk did you then find another organization or foundation that supported your ideals more closely but also supported breast cancer research with which to donate your money? In your article you appear to express real concern for helping those with this disease and yet as other have mentioned, you provided no alternative or evidence that you supported an alternative. Just a thought.

    Reply

  29. Rhianon

    Dear Bette,

    Thanks for stating you opinion about our Susan G. Komen for the Cure. I would like to clarify our position on why we fund Planned Parenthood and the truth behind if there is significant scientific evidence to support that birth control pills cause breast cancer.

    1. Below is a letter written by our Chief Scientific Advisor, Eric Winer, M.D.:
    March 2009
    An open letter about Susan G. Komen for the Cure® and Planned Parenthood
    This year, as in the past, Susan G. Komen for the Cure® is being criticized by some for funding a handful of women’s health programs run by, or with ties to, Planned Parenthood. I’m writing this letter to explain our position and to correct any misinformation you may have heard about this issue.
    Susan G. Komen for the Cure exists for only one reason: to save lives and to end breast cancer forever. In the past 27 years, we’ve invested more than $1.3 billion to accomplish those goals through research and for programs that educate, screen and treat people in communities all around the world.
    Early screening through mammograms and education is critical to end the suffering from this disease: 98 percent of women treated for early stage breast cancer, before it spreads, are alive five years later. The widespread use of mammography and heightened public awareness of breast cancer both contribute to these favorable statistics.
    And while Komen Affiliates provide funds to pay for screening, education and treatment programs in dozens of communities, in some areas, the only place that poor, uninsured or under-insured women can receive these services are through programs run by Planned Parenthood.
    These facilities serve rural women, poor women, Native American women, women of color, and the un- and under-insured. As part of our financial arrangements, we monitor our grantees twice a year to be sure they are spending the money in line with our agreements, and we are assured that Planned Parenthood uses these funds only for breast health education, screening and treatment programs.
    As long as there is a need for health care for these women, we will continue to fund the facilities that meet that need.
    One year ago, two Catholic ethicists – Ron Hamel, Ph.D. and Michael Panicola, Ph.D. – examined the moral implications of our funding decision. They concluded that it was morally permissible for the church to be involved with Komen in light of its funding agreements with Planned Parenthood.
    “The fact that some Komen affiliates, at times, provide funding to Planned Parenthood specifically and solely for breast health services cannot on the face of it be construed as wrongdoing,” the ethicists wrote. “The good that Komen does and the harm that would come to so many women if Komen ceased to exist or ceased to be funded would seem to be a sufficiently proportionate reason” for Catholics to support our funding decisions (emphasis added).
    Another piece of misinformation being spread by many who criticize Komen for the Cure for its Planned Parenthood grants is that abortion causes breast cancer. Well-conducted research consistently fails to support this claim. We agree with the bulk of scientific evidence – from the National Cancer Institute, Harvard, a rigorous study in Denmark and from Oxford University – that there is no conclusive link between breast cancer and induced abortion or miscarriage.
    It is important for women to receive accurate information about risk factors for breast cancer. There are steps a woman can take to reduce her risk of developing breast cancer (for example, maintaining a healthy weight) as well as important steps every woman should take to make sure that, if she does develop breast cancer, it is detected and treated as soon as possible. A complete list of risk factors and screening recommendations can be found on our website http://www.Komen.org.
    More detailed information is on our web site at http://www.komen.org. We invite you to review the documents there, and we thank you again for taking time to investigate our position on this issue.
    Eric Winer, M.D.
    Chief Scientific Advisor
    Susan G. Komen for the Cure®

    2. Our position on Birth Control causing breast cancer:

    Women who are currently using—or have recently used—birth control pills appear to have a slightly increased risk of breast cancer. A large pooled analysis of over 50 studies found a small increase in risk among women who were currently using the pill or had recently used it for 10 or more years [1]. However, this excess risk disappeared 10 years after women stopped using the pill [1].

    Most of the studies to date have looked at higher dose forms of the pill. One area under active study is how today’s lower dose birth control pills affect the risk of breast cancer. At this time, studies are limited.

    To view the full results of the study follow this link: http://ww5.komen.org/BreastCancer/Table9Birthcontrolpillsandbreastcancerrisk.html

    Reply

    1. Captoe

      Rhianon,
      There might have been some opinion content in the original post, but that Susan G. Komen for the Cure® gives to Planned Parenthood is fact which you have now officially verified. Thank you for participating.

      The Hamel and Panicola opinion is easily refuted. You cannot give directly or indirectly to Planned Parenthood without participating in grave evil.

      I find it interesting, and very revealing, that you chose to raise the issue of induced abortion as a cause of breast cancer. You seem to be defending abortion. Are you sure that this is a forum where defending abortion will garner more support than backlash for your organization?

      You admit that there is an increased risk of breast cancer. Should S.G.Komen be supporting any risk factors, even the factors which you have called “slight”?

      I am not qualified to compare the merits of one medical study over another, but it seems to me from your words that someone is lying. Is it Mayo Clinic Proceedings and the World Health Organization or is it you?

      Stop giving to Planned Parenthood. Find another provider for those screenings, certainly, but stop giving to Planned Parenthood.

      Reply

    2. Denys

      “In many communities, the only places where poor women, Native American women, Women of Color, rural women and the un- and under-insured can receive mammograms and other health care are abortion mills where unborn poor , Native American unborn, Unborn of Color, rural unborn, and the un- and under-insured unborn are liquidated and disposed of.”

      Also: the statement “Susan G Komen exists for one reason only: to save lives and end breast cancer forever” is a statement of sentiment, indeed of INTENSE and passionate and noble sentiment, but in CATHOLIC ethics, while our intentions do matter, they are not the only thing that matter.

      It is a special danger to which the postmodern, anti-rationalist mind is disposed to think that righteous intentions are self-justifying, and that the more ardent our commitment, the more unimpeachable the actions. (“I am only trying to help the children,” or “I am just a simply patriot who loves America” are two other frequently-troublesome declarations of noble sentiment.)

      Like Catpoe says: thanks for stopping by AND LENDING CREDIBILITY to Bette’s piece by confirming some key facts for us.

      Reply

    1. Cordelia

      Dr. Awesome, I read your linked memorandum. You need to read this document which details the innaccuracy of the statement that the Susan G. Komen Foundation makes that breast cancer is not in fact linked to abortion:

      http://www.jpands.org/vol10no4/brind.pdf .

      Also, the issue of money being directed PP , even though strictly for breast exams, is still a moral issue for us Catholics regardless of the so-called Catholic ethicists approval mentioned in this memo.

      If it is true, and I find it difficult to believe, that the ONLY option for under and un-insured poor, rurally located, and Native Americans in getting a mammogram is through PP, then Susan G. Komen should set up regular mammogram mobile units and use the money to serve these people so that no one’s ethics could possibly be compromised. I don’t think they really care.

      Reply

  30. Bette

    I recommend reading Abby Johnson’s book, “Unplanned,” to get the real facts on the Planned Parenthood abortion machine. Misinformation, lies, and deceit are all in a day’s work.

    Reply